Happy Sexy Millionaire: Unexpected Truths about Fulfilment, Love and Success

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“This book will change your life if you let it.” -Tom Bilyeu, Co-Founder/CEO of Impact Theory & Co-Founder of Quest Nutrition

We are losing ourselves. We’re chasing the wrong things, asking the wrong questions, and polluting our minds. It’s time to stop, it’s time to resist and it’s time to rethink the fundamental social blueprint that our lives are built upon.

Book Details

Pages

227 Pages

Language

English

Released

2012

The only worthwhile comparison is YOU yesterday vs YOU today. If you want to be happy, you have to focus on that

What is the moral of this story? One word – responsibility. The older I’ve become, and the further I’ve travelled in the business world, the more glaringly obvious it’s become to me that a key difference between the ‘happiest, sexiest millionaires’ – the most fulfilled, romantically prosperous and successful people – and the most unhappy, romantically ineffective, broke people, is the former’s ability and willingness to take responsibility. Humans are experts at taking responsibility for the great things that happen to them. You became a millionaire? ‘Yes, I’m self-made!’ You wrote a great book? ‘Yes, all my ideas!’ You won a bet? ‘Yes, I knew that would happen!’ But when life delivers misfortune, failure and hardship, taking responsibility becomes an impossible task for many. Who wants to take responsibility for not making rent, for getting fired, for gaining weight, for failing their driving test, for being dumped? No one.
If Adam says to himself ‘X thing made me angry’, then he will get angry more often and he’ll stay angry for longer periods of time. If he learns to reframe that sentence as ‘I made myself angry because of X thing’ he will get angry less often and stay angry for shorter periods of time.
Our emotional response is our fault and responsibility. If we’re able to realise that, we have the power to control it. If we don’t, like a hijacked plane, someone or something else will. Having control over your emotional responses means you can think, respond and act with reason and clarity, and rational thinking is far more conducive to successful outcomes.
Admitting to fault, failure, weakness, inexperience or naivety turns an uncomfortable mirror on ourselves in a way that a fragile ego or delicate self-esteem can’t always bear. If Nir Eyal is right, and we do live our lives avoiding psychological discomfort, then maybe our knee-jerk refusal to accept responsibility.